Friday, 22 February 2013

The Restaurant at the End of the Universe [Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy #2] - Douglas Adams

Synopsis


Facing annihilation at the hands of the warlike Vogons is a curious time to have a craving for tea. It could only happen to the cosmically displaced Arthur Dent and his curious comrades in arms as they hurtle across space powered by pure improbability--and desperately in search of a place to eat.

Among Arthur's motley shipmates are Ford Prefect, a long time friend and expert contributor to the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy; Zaphod Beeblebrox, the three-armed, two-headed ex-president of the galaxy; Tricia McMillan, a fellow Earth refugee who's gone native (her name is Trillian now); and Marvin, the moody android who suffers nothing and no one very gladly. Their destination? The ultimate hot spot for an evening of apocalyptic entertainment and fine dining, where the food (literally) speaks for itself.

Will they make it? The answer: hard to say. But bear in mind that the Hitchhiker's Guide deleted the term "Future Perfect" from its pages, since it was discovered not to be! 
Review

i am not usually in the habit of reading series so close together, I find I need to wait weeks if not months to work up the same enthusiasm as I originally did for the book however it seems few authors defy expectation, Douglas Adams included.

I read this book in less than a day and I'm well on my way to finishing the next book in the series, ''Life, The Universe, And Everythng ''. While reading the book I finally found the word that described this whole series, Spoof. Yes, I realise that this is a very simple word that should have taken me minutes instead of books to work out but Adams have a way of writing all expectations out of your brain. I also feel the need to mention that this book is the origin of the rather sarcastic and extremely funny quote you see in the picture below.






In this installment of the book, the company of four find themselves in Milliways, the Restaurant at the End of the Universe. I feel the need to explain that the proverbial 'at' used in this sentence is not a physical location as in ''at the end of the Universe'' but rather a statement about time as in ''at the end of the universe''. If this makes no sense to you please refer to the book ''The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy'' which to assure you is cheaper than it's alternative Encyclopedia Galactica and has the words DON'T PANIC in large friendly letters for your convenience. 

In this book the chase for the man who rules the universe is finally over and the origin of the human species is revealed. For those of you who are interested, it is not from cavemen or as Ford constantly points out not from not cavemen instead from... well who am I to spoil the surprise of our secret origin. Ford and Arthur are driven mad and brought back to sanity several times by getting stuck in prehistoric Islington. To the comfort of Arthur lovers and indeed those of us who can't help but want Martin Freeman alive and well to make the next Hobbit movie as well as season three of Sherlock I assure you that he will be brought back to present day soon to be extinct Earth in a complicated way in which that made perfect sense to no one but Douglas Adams himself.

The more I read the serious the sadder I becoming knowing that after I read the sarcastic and the rather strange way in which this book seems to be read in my head with the seriously too relaxing voice of Richard Dawking and slightly panicky and sarcastic tone of Martin Freeman , I will never get any more books from Mr Adams' himself, a fact that has never bothered me about any of the hundred and one dead authors whose books I have devoured previously.

Now that I have manage to actually avoid reviewing this book all together I feel that I should say something constrictive. The book much like the previous one had me laughing out loud and in stitches at some points. I found it odder and more mindbogglingly crazier than the first one which only managed to make it ever more entertaining. Personally I wished there was something critical I could say, I simply love ranting about books to people who might actually listen but the chances of me hating this book is at an improbability factor of 1 to infinity against.A reference that is potentially meaningless to all but the 15 million people who have read this book, a number which coincidentally enough is the number of Homo Sapien Sapiens that landed on earth two million years prior to it's destruction. The correlation of those two numbers is at an improbability factor of... oh I don't know something really really big.

I give this book 5 out of 5 with a sinking realisation that not a lot of people will even understand what the hell I am on about in which case welcome to the life of Arthur Dent.



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